Elder Futhark – reused wood & clay tiles

old-futhark
Elder Futhark (Runes)

Most Runic texts are found on hard surfaces such as rock, wood, and metal, and this might explain its angular shape. Because of the resemblance to Mediterranean scripts, it is very likely that Futhark was adapted from either the Greek or Etruscan alphabet. Even though the earliest Runic inscriptions are from the 3rd century CE, its origin may lie much deeper in the pre-history of Northern Europe. …

The Futhark of 24 letters is called “Elder Futhark”, and was used mostly before the 9th century CE. But as languages changed and more Germanic groups adopted it, Futhark changed as well to suit the language that it came to write.

Source: Ancientscripts.com

I spent this summer at the seaside as usual, on the Island of Pag , at Croatian Adriatic sea.  I’ve been collecting pieces of driftwood, pebbles, sea shells and other items modeled and shaped by the nature.

As the civilization gradually infiltrates into every bit of this planet, thus the construction sites  invades the shore. But the sea is the builder, the sculptor and the destroyer, so it takes from the land into its  depths then returns something scared, changed but beautiful. Walking down one of this deserted construction sites by the sea, I found pieces of planks, and bricks and roof tiles. But most interesting were those tiles fragments,  modeled and rounded by the sea,  looking like little pebbles. Sea made contemporary everyday objects look like ancient pieces. I wanted to make something with them, something that has an air of history.

So  I thought of runes…

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Lonely shallow – acrylic painting

Lonely shallow
Lonely shallow, 40×50 cm

In shallow waters, shrimps make fools of dragons.
-Chinese Proverb

Music theme: Shallow waters – Chris Norman

It is summer here and time for rest and fun by the sea. Still, most beautiful time of day for me is sunset. And here by Adriatic sea those sunsets are amazing and spectacular.

I tried to capture one of these silent and peaceful moments with all the shades and hues.

Technique I used  is ordinary – canvas, paint and brush. I felt that simple, yet beautiful scene like that, doesn’t need any special effects.

 

Process of painting and details of finished work:

 

Long as I can see the light (sea storm)- acrylic painting

sea storm
Sea storm 30×40 cm

There are times when the ocean is not the ocean – not blue, not even water, but some violent explosion of energy and danger: ferocity on a scale only gods can summon. It hurls itself at the island, sending spray right over the top of the lighthouse, biting pieces off the cliff. And the sound is a roaring of a beast whose anger knows no limits. Those are the nights the light is needed most.  -M. L. Stedman, The Light Between Oceans

   Music theme: Long as I Can See the Light – Creedence Clearwater Revival

This is the third of six canvases in „Natural phenomena” paintings series (Volcano eruption, Sea storm, Meteor impact, Blue moon, Aurora borealis, Solar eclipse).

Someone born by the sea told me a beautiful Croatian word for sea storm: “nevera” .

These days I feel like that inside of me… But as the title say, I will find my way long as I can see the light.

Making this painting was intuitive. I didn’t use any tricks, just let the brush dance. First, I’ve painted the sky, blending  colours to achieve dark stormy  mood. To paint the waves I’ve used flat wide brush generously soaked in paint and with soft continuous moves I’ve let the water flow. Then tapped with top of the brush to create the foam. With the pallet knife I added the rock.

When dry, I’ve painted the lighthouse, added clouds and moon and braking waves forming the sea foam on  the rock. Just a touch of yellow light and that was that.

 

Details: